Michael Francis Gebhart Architects
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The Johns Manville World Headquarters
(now Lockheed Martin)
Ken Caryl Ranch, Jefferson County, Colorado

The Architects Collaborative (TAC) that won a 9 firm invited national design competition for the design of the Johns-Manville World Headquarters, now Lockheed Martin, located on a 400-acre site in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains outside Denver.
The design objectives involved integrating the building into the rugged countryside in such a way that the integrity of the hills was preserved while the building was given the prominence and setting appropriate to an international headquarters.
The 750,000 square foot building stretches 1,100 feet across the valley floor, its gleaming aluminum skin and mirrored windows contrasting dramatically with the surrounding landscape.
Outstanding views of the mountains and the Denver skyline are available from throughout the building. Concealed parking for 1,700 cars is located to the rear of the building and on the roof. The entrance drive extends throughout the middle of the building, giving direct access to the reception areas.
Special facilities include a gallery and exhibition space, corporate library and information center, staff training and conference space, health center, gym, and a greenhouse cafeteria.
The Jury consisted of Harry M. Weese FAIA; Chairman Robert L. Geddes FAIA; Theodore C. Bernardi FAIA; W.R. Goodwin, President, Johns-Manville; and Hubertus J. Mittman ASLA.
The Jury noted that “urban architects, given a natural setting of this scope and dimension, can experience difficulty with the quintessential problem of the manmade environment meeting nature.” Their comments on the TAC entry: “the building is tied to Denver by a vista - an idea as old as architecture...The architects perceived that they could not fight with nature and there was no way to blend, so they chose to contrast...The J-M Building is an avowedly machine-made object.”
They commended “the striking appearance of the building as both thrilling and stunningly beautiful...the elegant clarity of the building, the simplicity of its shapes, the strength of its image...“A singular design...a significant advance in the state of the art, a landmark and an influence to similar undertakings in the future.”
The nine firms competing, in addition to TAC, included Welton Becket and Associates; Caudill Rowlett Scott, Inc.; Vincent G. Kling & Partners; Neuhaus and Taylor; I.M. Pei & Partners; William L. Pereira Associates; RTKL, Inc.; and Sert, Jackson Associates

Architectural Design Team:
Joseph D. Hoskins AIA was Principal in Charge
Michael F. Gebhart FAIA and John P. Sheehy FAIA RIBA were Co-Project Architects for Design Phase
Vernon Herzelle AIA and Eugene Hayes AIA were Co-Project Architects for Construction Documents
Mr. Sheehy and Mr. Herzelle were on site during the Construction Phase.
Structural Engineers: LeMessurier Associates
William LeMessurier
Cosentini Associates: MEP
Marvin Mass, and Joseph Morrongiello
Space Design Group: Program Compliance
Ronald Phillips



Renderings by Michael Gebhart
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